Finding Flexibility at MCKL

Finding Flexibility at MCKL

The American Degree Transfer Program (ADTP) at Methodist College Kuala Lumpur(MCKL) is notable for its flexibility where students are exposed to a wide range of studies across different disciplines; from physical and life sciences to art, history, literature, philosophy and religious studies. American universities have hundreds of majors on offer, giving students the freedom to chart their own career path.

Since its founding in 2014, more than 150 students have transferred to American universities through [email protected] Students in [email protected] have the opportunity to explore various fields of study before they transfer. [email protected] has 52 partner universities. Four of which offer exclusive scholarships to [email protected] students. Furthermore, students are free to apply to non-partnered universities. Our students have successfully transferred to non-partner universities such as The Ohio State University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Michigan -Ann Arbor, Purdue University, and San Jose State University.

The ADTP allows students to explore subjects outside of their chosen field of study. A student majoring in Finance can take a course in Chemistry during their time in the ADTP. 

Students can join the ADTP after completing their high school without having to go through pre-university. However, this does not mean that ADTP is academically inferior. It is a degree program, after all, hence students will be challenged to think and work at a much higher level than what they will need to do at a pre-university level. In terms of affordability, American universities are famed for their generosity. Students can apply for scholarships on their academic or extracurricular performance, and most of the scholarships can be stacked. Schools also provide financial aid to students. 

In the ADTP, students are introduced to a different study environment. They will soon discover that they will be seeing fewer examinations, but more continuous assessments – assignments, tests, presentations, and group projects, all of which will develop a well-rounded student.  

Students who join the [email protected] need not worry about how the American education system works because they will all undergo a course which will teach them everything they need to know about the American education system in the first semester. 

The [email protected] has intakes in January, April, and August.

For more information about the course,

WhatsApp +6019-2236712

Not Your Regular AUSMAT Programme

Not Your Regular AUSMAT Programme

The Australian Matriculation (AUSMAT) programme at MCKL is turning 20 this year! 

AUSMAT is a pre-university programme that prepares students for undergraduate studies in a variety of disciplines. The syllabus is contemporary, comprehensive and learner-friendly. The continuous method of assessment provides consistent monitoring of students’ progress and helps students transition smoothly into the evaluation system of higher learning.

Upon successful completion of the programme, students are awarded the Western Australian Certificate of Education (WACE).  Over the past 20 years, MCKL has consistently produced excellent WACE results. This year, 21 students achieved ATAR 90 and above with one student Hannah Li-An Cheah, making it to the top 0.5% for the Mathematics Applications subject. 

MCKL provides a unique learning experience for its AUSMAT students as the College does not focus only on classroom-based learning but also help students develop soft skills through its community-based Service Learning subject. Though it does not contribute to the final grading, this subject has helped our alumni develop skills and qualities that stand them in good stead in their university and scholarship applications.

One such student is Wong Xiao Cheng. A two-time recipient of the STAR Scholarship, she was also a recipient of the University of Nottingham’s Vice-Chancellor Global Graduate award. She credits MCKL’s holistic education for igniting her passion to help others and to pursue excellence in life. She believes that the Service Learning subject had inspired her to pursue community work as a career. She also praised MCKL lecturers for being genuine and passionate about empowering the students and walking the talk.

Another student is Yek Ren Yew. Like most MCKL newbies, he tut-tutted at the thought of having to fulfil 20 hours of community work to pass the Service Learning subject. He started doing community work only for the sake of doing it to fulfil a course requirement, but Ren Yew soon found that he enjoyed doing it so much that he racked up 40 hours of service, without realising it. 

Little did he know, the 40 hours would help him receive the YTL Foundation Scholarship to study at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia. His advice to students: TAKE SERVICE LEARNING SERIOUSLY! 

AUSMAT students at MCKL are provided with adequate resources and support to enhance their learning experience. They are given access to ReviseOnline, an online revision portal with a bank of more than 30,000 exam questions written by experts and teachers from Western Australia. MCKL students have found the portal helpful as it prepares them for examinations.

Intakes for the AUSMAT programme at MCKL are in January, March, and August.

For more information about the programme and scholarship opportunities,

WhatsApp +6019-2236712

INVEST IN YOUR CHILDREN’S HIGHER EDUCATION WITH TAX-EXEMPT SSPN-i AND SSPN-i PLUS

INVEST IN YOUR CHILDREN’S HIGHER EDUCATION WITH TAX-EXEMPT SSPN-i AND SSPN-i PLUS

INVEST IN YOUR CHILDREN’S HIGHER EDUCATION WITH TAX-EXEMPT SSPN

 

Saving for your children’s education with a tax relief and other incentives is such a big head start on your financial planning. You don’t have to think long when both the SSPN-i and SSPN-i Plus offer an RM8,000 and RM15,000 tax relief with competitive tax-exempt dividends at the same time, respectively.

INVEST IN YOUR CHILDREN’S HIGHER EDUCATION WITH TAX-EXEMPT SSPN

 

Saving for your children’s education with a tax relief and other incentives is such a big head start on your financial planning. You don’t have to think long when both the SSPN-i and SSPN-i Plus offer an RM8,000 and RM15,000 tax relief with competitive tax-exempt dividends at the same time, respectively.

How to invest in the SSPN scheme?

SSPN-i Plus Online at www.lovesspn.com

PTPTN Branches

PTPTN marketing executives

How to invest in the SSPN scheme?

SSPN-i Plus Online at www.lovesspn.com

PTPTN Branches

PTPTN marketing executives

Who qualifies as the depositor?

Who qualifies as the depositor?

Why invest in the SSPN?

Why invest in the SSPN?

RM8,000 tax relief incentive

E

Tax deductible amounts are based on the net SSPN savings of the current assessment year.

E

Tax relief for either a single (joint taxation as a couple) or separate filings (husband and wife to enjoy it separately).

RM8,000 tax relief incentive

E

Tax deductible amounts are based on the net SSPN savings of the current assessment year.

E

Tax relief for either a single (joint taxation as a couple) or separate filings (husband and wife to enjoy it separately).

SSPN account summary at your fingertips

for your account statement and income tax filing

SSPN account summary at your fingertips

for your account statement and income tax filing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Thanos Did In ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ is Justified

What Thanos Did In ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ is Justified

Written by Banu Chandran

What Thanos did in Avengers: Infinity War left everyone in shock. In the year 2018, Marvel produced the film ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ in which the space titan, Thanos, had collected all six stones of power known as the infinity stones that could change the world. With them, he erased half of all living things with a single snap in an attempt to save resources and curb overpopulation. Were his actions justified?

This was hotly debated in the final round of The Battle of Wits debate tournament on August 10th, hosted by Malaysiakini in collaboration with Brickfields Asia College. Two teams, Master DeBaters from SMK Sultan Abdul Samad and Rojak Pasembor from SMK Subang Utama, battled the motion out using wit and humor to support their stances. The debate centred around whether Thanos’ actions counted as genocide. The propositioning team, Master DeBaters, had set a solid mechanism and definition on their side of the motion, explaining that Thanos had not committed mass murder as the ‘blip’ simply ‘dusted’ them out of existence, meaning that the people had felt no pain and thus were not murdered. This was strongly rebutted by the opposition team, Rojak Pasembor, who defined what Thanos did as mass murder while taking an emotional stance that his actions resulted in effects that were similar to genocide, creating a widespread wave of grief and loss for many people around the world. 

The Master DeBaters had a passionate first speaker, Munirah Abdullah, an enthusiastic and profound second speaker, Haliem Shah bin Haja Mohideen, and a quick-witted third speaker, Devendran a/l Sivanandan, who was shockingly added into the debate in the first minute of the match by use of the ‘Power Card’: Switch one speaker with the reserve member, leaving Mior Arif bin Mior Mohd Farid out of the debate even though he had prepared together with the team.

However, with just as strong speakers, Rojak Pasembor managed to grab the win for the final round making them the champions of the day. The highly articulate first speaker, Thusar, had laid out their stance for the debate. Supported well by the second speaker, Nur Adib Zafry bin Nur Aziz, who eloquently using wit and humour, rebutted and brought forth points to reaffirm their stance. Last but not least, the third speaker, Benjamin Fong Ruan Wei, brought the debate to an explosive end with fire rebuttals for the opposing team’s points.

The Battle of Wits provided a debate platform like no other to allow these students to shine. Focusing more on wit and humour, the debates remained light-hearted and witty throughout the day. With the additional use of Power Cards that gave an Advantage to a team, a Disadvantage to the opposing team, or a Challenge Card, kept the debate fun and interesting as teams strategically used the cards to their advantage to help them with the debate. 

The day started with the students arguing whether or not autonomous artificial intelligence deserve human rights and whether the government should disclose all the information they had on the extra-terrestrial to the public. The round-robin format of debating was brought to a close with the motion ‘Malaysia would be better off if we weren’t colonized by the British’ – a motion that indeed brought out the best in the debaters.

The tournament was held at the Brickfields Asia College (BAC) campus in Petaling Jaya and lasted from morning to evening. BAC also generously provided goodie bags for the students that consisted of sponsored t-shirts and pens. We would like to thank BAC and our other sponsors, MyNews, Zero Waste, MAEKO, the BAC Debate Club, easyuni, Hybrid Infinity Tech, Trio and myburgerlab for making the day so memorable. With special thanks to Maria Chin Abdullah, who generously sponsored the prize money for the tournament, and to PAWS for making the day a roaring success. 

Malaysiakini looks forward to next years debate tournament, where the fun will be replicated in a hopefully nationwide debate tournament open for all to join.

Giving A Voice To Those In Need

Giving A Voice To Those In Need

Written by Ayesha Maria Faiz

Children from low-income families; disabled people; poor single mothers who have families to care for – when thinking of helping these groups of people, most tend to have a knee jerk reaction of giving or donating food to these families. No, it would not be wrong to give food, but it may not necessarily be something they need. Often times, it is what we think they need. So, what is it that they really need? All you have to do is ask – ask them directly, “How can we help you?” It is safe to say that you would be surprised to hear: the answer is never ‘food’.

I had the honour of sitting down and speaking to three of the board of directors of Suriana Welfare Society Malaysia (Suriana) that protects children in crisis. Suriana derives from ‘Suara Rintihan Kanak-Kanak’ which translates to ‘voice for children’. As the name suggests, Suriana helps children that come from homes of abuse, be it physical or drug-abuse, but they also assist disabled people and single mothers.

With a capacity of almost 30,000 people, Desa Mentari has “one of the highest number of social ills” James Nayagam, Chairman of Suriana tells me. Desa Mentari is one of the many ‘Projek Perumahan Rakyat (PPR)’ projects. Here, they set up a community centre within Desa Mentari, precisely at Block 5 to counter social ills found within the area. They set up their first Play And Learn (PaL) Centre, there. It is a centre where children can be safe when waiting for their parents to pick them up, while also learning some basic education. At the PaL Centre, the children learn through guided play because this way they are able to learn more with subjects such as music, traditional dance, and certain recreational activities. However, they also follow a syllabus when learning English, Bahasa Malaysia and Mathematics.

Other than school subjects, Rachel Ho, the Executive Director, explains how Suriana makes an effort to inculcate certain values, like discipline and manners, into the children’s lives. The children are taught how to greet teachers and visitors, and when eating, to wait till everyone has been served. A monitor is also appointed every week and during meal times, he or she will say a small prayer before everyone begins eating. Smiling, clearly proud with these children, Rachel says “We eat as a family now”. These lessons start at 3 in the afternoon to “accommodate those that come back from school” and whose parents are not around. This way, the children will not be alone in their homes, which could potentially lead them to be exposed to social ills around the area. Learning ends at about 7pm, but as there is a heavy emphasis on the children’s safety at Suriana, the PaL Centre only closes when the last child is picked up by the parent. 

Suriana also helps to register the disabled, be it child or adult. Disabled people or ‘orang kurang/kelainan upaya (OKU)’ as they are referred to here in Malaysia, have 15 benefits that they get from their OKU Card. Life should be made easier for them with this card, and yet there are so many who are not registered and do not have the card. I asked James, whether the OKU received the card immediately upon registration. The Chairman simply shook his head and said “Interesting, isn’t it?”, clearly disappointed with the system in which disabled people have to work. Nadia is a 30-year-old woman who is deaf, blind and mute. The Social Welfare Department declined to provide her with an OKU Card because they wanted to know “the cause of her blindness”. Rachel went to the Social Welfare Department and fought for the card for Nadia and managed to get it. For 30 years she has been living like this and for “30 years the parents have tried and couldn’t get anything,” Sri Ganesh, Director of Fundraising, states as he recalls the struggles Nadia and her family faced. He explains that even though Suriana started of protecting children in crisis, “when a case like [Nadia’s] comes up, you can’t say no”. This shows that Suriana will do all they can to aid the needs of those that are underprivileged. In one block of Desa Mentari, there are 15 OKU children, some of which have not seen the light of day, and there are even parents who have not been informed on what their children can receive. Suriana helps these children get registered and get the OKU Card so they can receive the “host of privileges” that is available for them.

Suriana also has income generating projects for poor single mothers. These projects allow mothers to earn a decent living without having to leave their homes in fear of their children’s safety. In one case, there was a mother who was afraid to go out for work as her husband would come back drunk and “insists on her going to the bedroom” Ganesh explains. Therefore the mother was concerned that should she leave for work, and her 15-year-old daughter is home when the father comes back, he might try to go after the young girl. The thought of that alone is horrifying. Hence if the mother works from home, she can protect her child and at least earn some income. The society found that the abuse is reduced tremendously and sometimes stopped altogether when the mother becomes “a partial breadwinner”.

These mothers are currently taking part in an income generating project, the 2020 Calendar Project, that Suriana has prepared for them. They learn from a quilling master who comes to teach them the art of quilling. The mothers, equipped with a brand new skill, make handcrafted patterns that are beautifully placed on each page month of the calendar. At the end of each month, the mothers get paid and they are satisfied with that because “for them not to go anywhere, but to sit in the house and earn is [in itself] money”. James went on to explain that they want families to remain together and ensure mothers are able to be with their children. By giving the mother work that can be done from home, the mother is able to be around her child and care for him or her, which correspondingly “prevents badhats from preying on” the child. Thus allowing the child to grow up “normally” and have an “uninterrupted” childhood. Therefore, the mothers need people to buy the calendars as that is their source of income and is the key to their children’s safety. To get a handmade 2020 calendar, you just need to give a minimum donation of RM50, and all proceeds go to helping the single mothers and keeping their darling children safe.

Suriana is in need of volunteers, funds, donors and of course, the purchasing of the calendars. They require volunteers to help run projects and assist wherever help is needed. However, more importantly, they need funds to carry out the projects. They are hoping to open more PaL Centres in various PPR Flats to help more families and their children. Suriana also needs funds to have staff aid the disabled people. If they can use a volunteer to help, they will use the volunteer because it saves money, but sometimes they are unable to use volunteers as permanent staff are needed. Ganesh elaborated that some appointments a disabled person has to go for cannot be postponed if the volunteer is unavailable that day, hence paid staff are needed as they will definitely be there. All donations that go to Suriana are not only tax exempted, but also strictly controlled. “We believe in credibility, accountability, [and] transparency,” said James, “we have advisers … and we also have strict procedures as to how the money should be used”. As everyone in Suriana is so heavily involved in assisting the community, they barely have any time to try and raise funds. They intend to have an OKU hotline, which has never been done before in Malaysia, that will allow anyone to call in to ask for assistance. “We’d love to help as many as possible” James said, as he urged me to include his and his colleagues’ contact details in my article, for Suriana is the change that is helping these communities, with a 30% reduction in violence being a clear indicator that what they are doing is making a significant difference.

“Change comes when we are in the community, not waiting for people to come to [us]”

– James Nayagam, Chairman of Suriana Welfare Society Malaysia

The main concern of these disadvantaged communities is not the lack of food. They are concerns neither you nor I would have thought of: writing a letter of application, getting referrals to the hospital, registering for an OKU Card let alone being informed on the benefits that disable people have. These are small things that we do not think of because we have the privileged mindset of ‘Google-ing it’. However, Suriana tells these families “we will journey with them if they have a child who is disabled and the child needs assessment or medical treatment,” says James. They are one of the few non-governmental organisations who actually set up a community centre to work with the community as opposed to a ‘touch-and-go’ approach taken by many. They do their best to aid these families with what they need, but they do not stop nor let go there. Suriana is constantly trying to move these families to the next level. James states firmly, “That is what they need”.


If you would like to help, whether it is in the form of volunteering, donating or even buying one of the 2020 calendars, you may contact any of these numbers:

 

Suriana Welfare Society Malaysia – 1300 88 2200 / [email protected] 

Website: www.suriana.org

Facebook: facebook.com/surianawelfaresociety 

 

James Nayagam (Chairman) – 012 314 1100 / [email protected] 

Rachel Ho (Executive Director) – 012 211 4444 / [email protected] 

Sri Ganesh (Director of Fundraising) – 016 335 2477 / [email protected] 

 

All photos are credited to Suriana Welfare Society Malaysia

The bond between Epsom College (Malaysia) and Epsom College (UK)

The bond between Epsom College (Malaysia) and Epsom College (UK)

Written by Dr Murray Tod, Incoming Headmaster

Epsom College in Malaysia (ECiM) opened in September 2014 and is a fully-fledged sister school to Epsom College UK (located in Surrey, England). The school is co-educational (pupils from 3-18 years of age) and operates a small Prep School in addition to the Senior School (all on one site). Located south of KL, we are also fortunate to be within 25 minutes of KLIA and KLIA2 and this caters to all our interested pupils, from countries such as Korea, Japan and China, who desire a superb educational grounding in a school based upon British traditions.

In fact, the clear links between both Colleges, ECiM and ECUK, are also evident in our respective estates: ECiM, like its UK equivalent, offers an unrivalled location providing a 50 acre campus with excellent facilities and the scope for ample boarding house accommodation. However, it is in the ethos of the schools, and the nature of the individual care that they prioritise, through which the parallels of ECiM and ECUK are brought more sharply into focus. Epsom College in the UK was founded in 1855 on the outstanding principles of ‘Benevolence and Excellence’, and all Epsomians possess these charitable virtues and seek to raise standards in all walks of life. At Epsom in Malaysia we too strive to fulfil the guiding perspectives of our sister school, building upon the very best British tradition, but enhanced also by our own values and drive for success in the international world. ECiM is thus neatly encapsulated by our belief in ‘British Tradition, Global Learning, Universal Success’.

Epsom College UK. Credits:www.epsomcollege.org.uk

We are hugely proud, and protective, of our Epsom brand and it can also be glimpsed in the commonality of our educational philosophies (with the focus on excellence in IGCSE and A-level pupil attainment), the boarding houses rooted in outstanding pastoral care (and shared nomenclature) and the first class enrolment of our students into top universities (both in the UK and around the world). At ECiM, of course, we are always looking to add value and progression to our own performance, and we are fortunate to benefit from the experience of ECUK as one of the UK’s foremost co-educational boarding schools. Indeed, this was reaffirmed as recently as February 2019 when ECUK received a remarkable rating of ‘Excellent’, across all areas, from the UK’s Independent Schools’ Inspectorate (ISI). In fact, the ISI offered ‘no recommendations’ for improvement; a rare result and the gold standard, the pinnacle, to which Epsom in Malaysia must aspire.

Both Epsoms are, of course, centred in delivering first-class pupil welfare and achievement, but close ties also exist concerning teacher standards and recruitment. A high proportion of ECiM’s teaching body are UK trained, and both Deputy Heads (Academic & Pastoral) have been recruited through a selection process involving the Headmasters of ECUK and ECiM. Furthermore, after the sterling and innovative leadership of Dr John Kennard over the previous two years, Dr Murray Tod will take on the Headship in August 2019, having assumed various roles of responsibility at ECUK and ECiM since 2002. Dr Tod’s affinity to the Epsom brand is at the core of his educational vision and he will be steadfast in his commitment to encouraging further links between Epsomians, both old and new.

Ultimately, however, the most significant link between Epsom in Malaysia and the UK rests in the collective vision of an aspirational belief in the ability of all young men and women to challenge themselves, and pursue high level goals in all their endeavours. We prepare our pupils to be international in outlook and to embrace all cultures, guiding principles that are enmeshed in the DNA of all committed Epsomians across the globe.

Join us for an Info Day for prospective Sixth Form students on 15 June. All Year 11 students and SPM leavers are invited. Our Sixth Form specialists will be on hand to give advice and guidance about subject combinations, university applications and your future career options.